SidebySide

Elandri

Losing our daughter was and will always be one of the hardest things we would ever have to face. It happened to us. The one thing that you always think…. Well that will never happen to us. It only happens to other people, but never to us. It did. Our daughter Elandri was diagnosed with 3 severe brain deformities shortly after birth. Her life expectancy. Not above infancy. She was 6 weeks old when the first diagnosis was made. I still remember the colour of the dress, of the mother who was sharing the room with us. She was an Herero Lady. The Dr politely asked her if she understood Afrikaans. She said yes. He then asked her if she would mind leaving the room and getting herself a cup of coffee. I knew the news would not be good. I remember the feeling of holding on to my heart who keeps wanting to drop to the floor….
Elandri was so small, frail, and very very sick. One seizure after the other filled her days. Our journey to finding ourselves, her purpose and our purpose just started in that hospital room.
At six weeks old, she was diagnosed with ACC (Agenises of the Corpose Collosum), at 8 months old she was diagnosed with Lissencephaly and at 1 year and 6 months she was diagnosed with complete brain malformation. We packed our bags every few months, going to South Africa to look for what we hoped would be answers to all our questions. Every time we landed on the soils of South Africa my heart was broken over and over again. Over and over again I heard that there is nothing we can do. We have to keep her comfortable for as long as we can. My question? “How long is long?” Their answer……. Not long…. According to all the information we gathered we would have a year or two with her.
For us every thing fell apart. How do you prepare yourself to say goodbye while keeping her alive. I was a bookkeeper, my husband a technician. We did not know how to care for a child with severe needs. How to resuscitate, and do emergency care for a child with extreme medical challenges. In that moments of her fist diagnosis we both felt unqualified, fearful and uncertain about our own strength.
We heard the doctors say. She would live a while, but would have no quality of life. Quality of life? What does that mean? And that is where the journey started. This journey. Our journey of finding ourselves, helping our oldest two daughters accepting death and finding the meaning of quality of life.
She was only 6 weeks old when the whole cores of our lives changed, and she was never meant to live just a year or two. She lived 9 years, 7 months and 14 days. And in this 9 years, 7 months and 14 days we started living. We really found each other. But we had the choice. Her legacy could be one of heart break, failed marriage and a broken home for her sisters or it could be helping her parents and sisters find purpose, and live life limitless. In the end, this is her legacy. She bought us all home. She lived to guide us to this place. Side by Side Early Intervention Centre is what it is because of the plans God had for not just her, but every child in Namibia. This is Elandri’s journey. While she walk the earth, and the legacy of her journey after she for filled her purpose. She was born February 21st 2013, it was marked as the beginning of the greatest miracles in our lives. There was thousands of miracles that followed after her birth. She died October the 5th 02:02 in the morning. It is marked as the hardest day of my life.

Your passage is heartfelt, and overall, the grammar and spelling are good. However, I’ve made a few minor corrections for clarity and consistency:

“Losing our daughter was and will always be one of the hardest things we would ever have to face. It happened to us. The one thing that you always think… Well, that will never happen to us. It only happens to other people, but never to us. It did. Our daughter, Elandri, was diagnosed with three severe brain deformities shortly after birth. Her life expectancy? Not above infancy. She was six weeks old when the first diagnosis was made. I still remember the color of the dress of the mother who was sharing the room with us. She was a Herero Lady. The doctor politely asked her if she understood Afrikaans. She said yes. He then asked her if she would mind leaving the room and getting herself a cup of coffee. I knew the news would not be good. I remember the feeling of holding onto my heart, which kept wanting to drop to the floor…

Elandri was so small, frail, and very, very sick. One seizure after the other filled her days. Our journey to finding ourselves, her purpose, and our purpose just started in that hospital room.
At six weeks old, she was diagnosed with ACC (Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum); at 8 months old, she was diagnosed with Lissencephaly, and at 1 year and 6 months, she was diagnosed with complete brain malformation. We packed our bags every few months, would make our way to South Africa in the search for answers to our questions. Every time we landed on the soils of South Africa, my heart was broken over and over again. Over and over again, I heard that there is nothing we can do. We have to keep her comfortable for as long as we can. My question? “How long is long?” Their answer… Not long… According to all the information we gathered, we would have a year or two with her.

For us, everything fell apart. How do you prepare yourself to say goodbye while keeping her alive? I was a bookkeeper; my husband, a technician. We had our fist daughter in April of 2010, our second was born in September of 2011 and then we had Elandri in February of 2013. We did not know how to care for a child with severe needs, how to resuscitate, and do emergency care for a child with extreme medical challenges. In those moments of her first diagnosis, we both felt unqualified, fearful, and uncertain about our strength.

We heard the doctors say she would live a while but would have no quality of life. Quality of life? What does that mean? And that is where the journey started. This journey. Our journey of finding ourselves, helping our oldest two daughters accept death, and finding the meaning for quality of life.
She was only six weeks old when the whole cores of our lives changed, and she was never meant to live just a year or two. She lived 9 years, 7 months, and 14 days. And in these 9 years, 7 months, and 14 days, we started living. Make no mistake, for the first 3 years, we died, we were broken, challenged and barely survived. But then we got up, we changed the way we looked at her, she was not our dieing daughter, she was our daughter. Her sisters deserved to get to know her. We decided that she would have a legacy…..We then really found each other. But we had the choice. Her legacy could be one of heartbreak, a failed marriage, and a broken home for her sisters, or her legacy would be one of for filled purpose and live life limitless. In the end, this is her legacy. She brought us all home. She lived to guide us to this place of hope. Because of her, we found peace. Side by Side Early Intervention Centre is what it is because of the plans God had for not just her but every child in Namibia. This is Elandri’s journey. While she walked the earth, and the legacy of her journey after she fulfilled her purpose. She was born on February 21st, 2013; it was marked as the beginning of the greatest miracles in our lives. There were thousands of miracles that followed after her birth. She died on October 5th, 2022 at 02:02 in the morning. It is marked as the hardest day of my life.”

She was born on February 21st, 2013; it was marked as the beginning of the greatest miracles in our lives. There were thousands of miracles that followed after her birth. She died on October 5th, 2022 at 02:02 in the morning. It is marked as the hardest day of my life.”

Sermon done by Pastor Roland Engel